Tuesday, September 23, 2014

What Is Narrative Nonfiction?



What is Narrative Nonfiction?  We all know that nonfiction is text made up of information that is true. But what happens when the nonfiction text reads like a story? What's that called? It's called Narrative Nonfiction and we're going to read an example of it today.  But before we do, study the images below and learn more about Narrative Nonfiction.   



Previewing Vocabulary  "Unbroken: A Year in the Life of a Girl With Cancer," the narrative nonfiction piece we will be reading together today, is heavy on medical terminology, or medical words. It's important for us to preview these words before we read so that we can better understand the selection. Each group will be assigned one word to learn and master and then will present it's meaning and additional information to the class. Feel free to Google your word for more information and/or to find an accompanying image.   


















Guided Reading: "Unbroken: A Year in the Life of a Girl With Cancer"  Today, both before we read and as we read, we will be tasked with identifying and analyzing some of the various elements of nonfiction present in the selection. You can find the assignment 'Identifying Nonfiction Elements - Unbroken' in your Language Arts folders, as well as a link here

We will also be tasked with doing a "Close Reading" of the text. When we read closely, we are reading deeply and sometimes even going beyond the literal words on the page. As "close readers," we are "reading between the lines," making inferences, and considering the meaning and purpose of words, phrases, and ideas. Prepare to avoid the surface today as you read and dig deep! You can find the assignment 'Close Reading Questions - Unbroken' in your Language Arts folders, as well as a link here

We will be reading and analyzing "Unbroken: A Year in the Life of a Girl With Cancer" over the course of the next several days. You can find a copy of the story in your Language Arts folders, as well as a link here

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. (2.) Make some progress on your 'Unbroken' assignments.